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Book Review: Can We Live Here? by Sarah Alderson

November 30, 2015

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: Can We Live Here? by Sarah AldersonCan We Live Here? by Sarah Alderson
Published by Blink on 6th August 2015
Pages: 256
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
four-stars
Last week, I was sitting in seven layers (two of them thermal) next to a fire, with a blanket wrapped around me. Now, I am sleeping in kickers and a vest under a fan. Let the mosquitos bite me. They can have me ... Can we live here? ... If I don't become roadkill in the next few days, I'll let you know my thoughts.

In 2009, Sarah and John Alderson quit their full-time jobs in London and headed off, with Alula, their three-year-old daughter, on a global adventure to find a new home. For eight months, they travelled through Australia, the US and Asia navigating India with a toddler in a tutu, battling black magic curses in Indonesia and encountering bears in North America asking themselves one defining question: Can We Live Here?

Inspirational, hilarious and fascinating this is an unforgettable travel memoir and a unique guide to quitting your job, following your dreams and finding your home in a far-flung paradise

I generally don’t read non-fiction, but I couldn’t resist picking up Can We Live Here? by Sarah Alderson. I already follow her on Twitter, and have been meaning to read more of her books since Conspiracy Girl, so this was the perfect place for me to start.

I absolutely loved this book. It’s more like you’re having a chat with Sarah about her travels to Goa, Singapore and Bali (amongst other places) instead of reading her blog-turned-book. I loved the underlying theme of the book, the “fuck it, yes” mentality, as it’s something that we all secretly wish we could say to most things. It’s easy to daydream about quitting our jobs and travelling the world, but instead of daydreaming about it, Sarah Alderson actually did it, and that’s what made reading Can We Live Here? all the more entertaining.

And this book is hilarious. There were parts that had me giggling out loud, chuckling away to myself during my lunchbreak, parts that had me cringing at the sheer awkwardness of the situation, and parts that just made me feel obscenely jealous that Sarah had the balls to say “fuck it” and just go for what she wanted to do.

I would urge everyone to pick up this book, not just fans of Sarah Alderson, but those who feel they’re stuck in a rut, and want help in pushing themselves out of their comfort zones and dipping their toes into unknown waters.