Book Review: One by Sarah Crossan

October 1, 2015

I received this book for free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: One by Sarah CrossanOne by Sarah Crossan
Published by Bloomsbury Children's Books on 27th August 2015
Pages: 448
Source: Netgalley
Goodreads
five-stars
Grace and Tippi are twins – conjoined twins.

And their lives are about to change.

No longer able to afford homeschooling, they must venture into the world – a world of stares, sneers and cruelty. Will they find more than that at school? Can they find real friends? And what about love?

But what neither Grace or Tippi realises is that a heart-wrenching decision lies ahead. A decision that could tear them apart. One that will change their lives even more than they ever imagined…

From Carnegie Medal shortlisted author Sarah Crossan, this moving and beautifully crafted novel about identity, sisterhood and love ultimately asks one question: what does it mean to want and have a soulmate?

I want to rave about this book forever. How I’ve never read a book by Sarah Crossan before is a total mystery, and I’ll definitely be rectifying that soon, as One is an absolutely amazing, emotional read.

One is the first book I’ve read written in free verse, and it is such a beautiful style of writing. I doubt One would have had such an emotional impact on me if it had been written in regular prose, each word in One is written for a reason, it remains descriptive without using extra words just for the sake of it. I found I really got into Grace’s head a lot easier than I expected, and my emotions quickly became linked to the emotions I was reading on the page.

One is probably one of the most emotionally-charged books I’ve read in a very, very long time. As I just said, everything that Grace felt, I felt. Her despair, her hurt, her frustration all hit me very hard. This really surprised me, and it’s made me love Sarah Crossan for getting me to connect to this book and feel these emotions. One is a book that can’t just be read, it needs to be felt.

Everything about this book felt authentic to me, and it’s clear that a lot of research has gone into One. It really felt read, from how Tippi and Grace go about their daily lives to how the rest of society react to them. I liked how they weren’t accepted by the school (sounds strange, but bear with me), they were made to feel like outcasts, which I reckon wouldn’t be too far from the truth in the real world. I really admired Tippi’s integrity. She refuses to allow the media into her family’s lives until it’s absolutely necessary, until they have absolutely no other choice. And she still protected her family as best as she could. The documentary process was wonderful too – limits were made and respected, certain parts of Tippi and Grace’s journey weren’t touched, and that was the end of it. No ifs, buts or maybes.

The ending of One took a slight twist for me. I thought I knew how it would end, but Crossan threw in a tiny curveball and actually made reading the rest of the book quite painful for me. I can’t say anything else without giving things away, but the ending was, and still is, very raw to me.

One is an excellent book. There’s nothing left for me to say.

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